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  1. #1
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    Default Atentie baietzii se pregatesc: Activity logs from ISP!!!


    Aviz pentru cei cu Nfusion se pregatesc baietzii sa intre in fortza sub pretextul child porn, um moment excelent ca sa ne taie la privacy, uite cum incet incet o sa ajungem ca in "1984 movie" o sa ajunga ne monitorizeze si cantitatea de aer respirata si sa ne-o taie cand gafaim prea tare...solutia de moment pentru Nfusion users ar fi utilizarea a public proxi sau mai sigur VPN cu IP public undeva in afara Americii de Nord si atunci ii pupati pe frunte parinteste )

    Cititi aici:
    -------------
    A Superior Court in Ontario, Canada has ruled that IP addresses are akin to your home address, and therefore people have no expectation of privacy when it comes to their online activities being accessed by law enforcement. This means that, in Canada, police can potentially request information from your ISP about online activities, and can do so without a warrant.
    Your activities on the Internet are akin to your activities out in public—they're not private and are possibly open for police scrutiny, according to an Ontario Superior Court. The ruling was made by Justice Lynne Leitch on—surprise!—a child pornography case. The judge said that there's "no reasonable expectation of privacy" when it comes to logs kept by ISPs. Canadians, watch out, because everything you do online could soon be turned into legal fodder, even without a warrant.
    The case in question came about when, in 2007, police asked Bell Canada to hand over subscriber information for a particular IP address that they suspected of accessing and "making available" child porn online. According to the National Post, the ISP handed over the name and contact information for the account without asking for a warrant, which is apparently typical among ISPs in Canada only if the request is related to a child porn investigation.
    The lawyer for the defendant—the defendant being the husband of the woman whose name was on the account—disagreed with Bell Canada's actions. He argued that since there were no accusations of luring a child or putting a minor in danger, a warrant should have been required. This argument was rejected by Judge Leitch, however, who equated the information to data that the state already has.
    "One's name and address or the name and address of your spouse are not biographical information one expects would be kept private from the state," she wrote. She also stated that Canada's Personal Information Protection Electronics Documents Act allows for ISPs to give IP information to a "lawful authority," which she interpreted as not requiring a warrant.
    Though it's clear that the ruling in the case (which is still ongoing) was made with good intentions, privacy advocates know what the road to hell is paved with. Critics fear that such a precedent could open the doors to police asking for information on all manner of Internet activities, ranging from the embarrassing to the questionable-but-legal, without judicial oversight.
    One instructor from Toronto's Osgoode Hall Law School argued that, even when criminal activity is suspected, a warrant should be required.
    "[E]veryone wants to get at the child abusers," professor James Stribopoulos told the National Post, which is why judges seem to be agreeing with Judge Leitch's interpretation of the law. "It is not just your name, it is your whole Internet surfing history. Up until now, there was privacy. An IP address is not your name, it is a 10-digit number. A lot more people would be apprehensive if they knew their name was being left everywhere they went."
    IP addresses aren't necessarily accurate indicators of who's behind certain activities online. As many college campuses in the US have argued to the RIAA, IP addresses are reassigned often and no single student can be tied to a single IP address much of the time. IP address data can even be incorrect (or incorrectly matched up by ISPs), leading to some being unfairly accused of illegal activities.
    Judge Leitch's ruling has privacy advocates in Canada worried, as it is binding to lower courts in Ontario. "There is no confidentiality left on the Internet if this ruling stands," Stribopoulos said
    FORUM RULES
    Nomad Iresponsabil

  2. #2
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    tot ce misca pe internet poate sa fie descoperit. tu chiar crezi ca o cerere la un isp din romania nu va duce la defaimarea ip-ului folosit ? Iluzii desarte. Cel mai sigur mod ramane utilizarea unui cont isp fantoma (fara nume). punand la o parte implicatiile legale explicate mai sus chiar ma intrebam cand o sa apara si in alte parti "legalizarea" acestui fapt care se petrece de cativa ani in state sub umbrela DMCA.

  3. #3
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    ok, de acord cu tine doar ca legea nu are efect INCA in UE, in plus daca eu fac un VPN intre ARIN IP si EU tot traficul este encriptat inclusiv headerele de source si destination, este in principiu foarte greu sa te miroasa si la cat shit este pe internet va dura extrem de mult sa faca tracing. Prin natura meseriei am avut o experienta asemanatoare la un operator in Africa si am fost pus sa managiunesc tracing la niste useri care faceau 419 scam. Crede-ma dupa un an de transpiratie si log search din cateva sute de scameri nu am reusit sa prindem dacat vreo doi-trei, detalii daca vrei ti le dau pe PM. Uite-te cat se chinuie astia sa "prinda" scammerii din Dragasani, si tot nu i-a prins pe toti. Technologia este inca in stone age, mai intai or sa se "ocupe" de pestisorii mai mici si usor de prins care se "dau" cu nfusionul "direct" pe net" apoi mai greu cu cei care se dau prin public proxi si la urma or sa se ocupe de vpn. La cat volum de nfusion s-a vandut vor trebuie sa angajeze la greu oameni care sa "urmareasca" logurile, so for the moment mai avem pana sa ne facem probleme insa e un early warning cu ce ne-asteapta. Unchiul Sam o sa-shi bage usor usor spycamul si in cur in cativa ani. Eshalonu a murit...traiasca eshalonu!

    Quote Originally Posted by pop_eye View Post
    tot ce misca pe internet poate sa fie descoperit. tu chiar crezi ca o cerere la un isp din romania nu va duce la defaimarea ip-ului folosit ? Iluzii desarte. Cel mai sigur mod ramane utilizarea unui cont isp fantoma (fara nume). punand la o parte implicatiile legale explicate mai sus chiar ma intrebam cand o sa apara si in alte parti "legalizarea" acestui fapt care se petrece de cativa ani in state sub umbrela DMCA.
    FORUM RULES
    Nomad Iresponsabil

  4. #4
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    ok, un lucru trebuie invatat de aici. legea e lege si nu tocmeala. daca pun baietii legea in aplicare "citeste cu atentie partea cu history logs" nu o sa conteze ce headere ai tu in trafic. in mod sigur ca pot sa iti lege ceva de gat si simplul fapt ca vizitezi acest site poate deveni motiv de banuiala. spre exemplu DMCA in state da dreptul "organelor' sa te banuiasca si sa te acuze fara multe dovezi concludente (deja s-a sarit calul demult) acum vor sa faca asta posibil si in alte parti ale lumii.

    Quote Originally Posted by yo3gjc View Post
    ok, de acord cu tine doar ca legea nu are efect INCA in UE, in plus daca eu fac un VPN intre ARIN IP si EU tot traficul este encriptat inclusiv headerele de source si destination, este in principiu foarte greu sa te miroasa si la cat shit este pe internet va dura extrem de mult sa faca tracing. Prin natura meseriei am avut o experienta asemanatoare la un operator in Africa si am fost pus sa managiunesc tracing la niste useri care faceau 419 scam. Crede-ma dupa un an de transpiratie si log search din cateva sute de scameri nu am reusit sa prindem dacat vreo doi-trei, detalii daca vrei ti le dau pe PM. Uite-te cat se chinuie astia sa "prinda" scammerii din Dragasani, si tot nu i-a prins pe toti. Technologia este inca in stone age, mai intai or sa se "ocupe" de pestisorii mai mici si usor de prins care se "dau" cu nfusionul "direct" pe net" apoi mai greu cu cei care se dau prin public proxi si la urma or sa se ocupe de vpn. La cat volum de nfusion s-a vandut vor trebuie sa angajeze la greu oameni care sa "urmareasca" logurile, so for the moment mai avem pana sa ne facem probleme insa e un early warning cu ce ne-asteapta. Unchiul Sam o sa-shi bage usor usor spycamul si in cur in cativa ani. Eshalonu a murit...traiasca eshalonu!

  5. #5
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    la fel de probabil sa ii loveasca pe doritorii de torente, nu?

  6. #6
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    Exclamation


    Pin' s-ar satura de atita paranoia, si vor inventa altceva, cine stie ce va fi la moda
    in citiva ani

    Putzina lectura cu cine-i vinovat, la:
    http://forum.paytv.ro/showthread.php?t=93273

    ca sa nu le injur direct faita.

    Alf

 

 

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