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  1. #1
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    Default Kudelski out and bleeding... again!


    This is a translated page from the Netherlands and describes exactly why N3 won't be a problem.

    Kudelski card hacker at Black Hat conference in Amsterdam..

    PAID ACCESS SYSTEMS. A key witness in the court case opposing the Swiss group Kudelski against the media giant News Corporation was passing by in Amsterdam, attending a conference on computer piracy. We met him.

    François Pilet, Amsterdam
    Saturday, March 29 2008

    The audience is glued to the lips of Christopher Tarnovsky. In front of a podium of hackers and security specialists - with an average age of 25 - the self-taught electronics specialist revealed the techniques that allow him to break open chip cards that block access to pay TV chains in the whole world.

    The scene takes place in the Mövenpick hotel in Amsterdam, where the European edition of the Black Hat conference was held Thursday and Friday last week. This is one of the prime professional meetings dedicated to computer piracy. Among the twenty or so speakers invited to this big get-together, Christoper Tarnovsky talked for more than one and a half hour in the "Lausanne" room - a sign of destiny (Tr. note: Lausanne is a Swiss city close to the headquarters of the Kudelski Group).

    Employed by NDS

    The American 39-year-old is accused of having been recruited by the Israeli company NDS, a competitor of Kudeslki, for breaking and publish on the Internet the safety codes of Canal Plus in 1999 and then repeating the operation at the expense of the group Vaud and its customers. The dissemination of codes had enabled hundreds of thousands of pirates access to encrypted programs without paying subscription.

    The American Echostar satellite platform, which uses maps to protect its contents, said she had lost hundreds of millions of dollars due to piracy and called for a billion dollars in compensation from NDS, a subsidiary of media group News Corp.

    During the month of April, Christopher Tarnovsky testify in a court in California to defend NDS, which has employed for ten years, since 1997. According to him, Kudelski and Echostar have invented from scratch, the plot of which they claim to be victims to mask the weakness of their encryption system.

    In his eyes, the case against NDS is nothing short of an extortion attempt. "Sure, I've broken the cards of Kudelski", he annoyedly states. "I was paid by NDS to do it. This is an activity that all companies in the trade do. But why would I have published these codes on the Net for free? I am not stupid, and I never had the intention of taking that risk."

    Tarnovsky no longer works for the group over the past year. He launched his independent company, Flylogic, through which it puts its know-how available to consumer electronics manufacturers to test the strength of their products face of the onslaught of pirates before they are put on the market.

    Christopher Tarnovsky detailing the fragility of the system based on these chips designed by a handful of companies, like Motorola ( MOT ) and Infinenon, which are used in products as diverse as remote garage, alarm systems and car TV decoders.

    Unbreakable? Wrong!

    Manufacturers of semiconductors claim that their chips are inviolable. Companies that integrate them into their products rely on the specifications provided to them. They think that their secrets will be well guarded. That is not true, of course. "

    Christopher Tarnovski uses HydroBromic acid to eat away at the passivation layers and doping guns to cut/add traces to a working IC. And to submit photos of his laboratory, fitted with equipment he used for a few thousand dollars. At the center, a powerful Zeiss microscope to enter the heart of the chip which are hidden the precious codes. The successive layers of silicon are revealed with acids and lasers. The engineer then explained how he took control of the map by bypassing its protections with long microscopic needles. Within minutes for the weakest, a few hours for the best-designed, the contents of the card opens 9 times out of 10 these assaults.

    Upon questions, a voice is raised in the back of the room. An engineer from Microsoft expressed concern: "Have you looked at our processor game console Xbox360? I have been offered 100000 dollars for the break, Tarnovsky said. But I replied that it was not enough. "

    It has not invested enough

    At the turn of a journalist Estonian. Son pays, . His country, a precursor of cyberdemocracy, introduced in 2001 an identity card chip, which can be used for banking transactions like online voting. This is a Motorola, sniffs Tarnovsky. A former model, poorly secured.

    And Kudelski cards? In short embarrassed silence before flies his responce, "Sorry for them: the last two generations have been broken. The next will be also. They have not invested enough in research over the past decade. Today, Kudelski has more money, see the share price. They hope to rebuild with the trial, but they will lose. "
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  2. #2
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    Title is misleading. Every provider is subject to bleed. It is not just Kudelski.
    Last edited by gxavier; 30th April 2008 at 10:26.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by anishpsla View Post
    Here in RDI, Kudelski is the hero because of I2E.

    By the way , we have a light to see Dream Tv & Ben Sport in future.
    " 李俊明 Born To Help People "

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  4. #4
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    C/P for your reading pleasure

    Did a Rupert Murdoch company go too far and hire hackers to sabotage rivals and gain the top spot in the global pay-TV war?

    This is the question a jury will be facing in a spectacular five-year-old civil lawsuit that has, oddly, received little notice from media.

    The case involves a colorful cast of characters that includes former intelligence agents, Canadian TV pirates, Bulgarian and German hackers, stolen e-mails and the mysterious suicide of a Berlin hacker who had been courted by the Murdoch company not long before his death.
    On the hot spot is NDS Group, a UK-Israeli firm that makes smartcards for pay-TV systems like DTV. The charges stem from 1997 when NDS is accused of cracking the encryption of rival NagraStar, which makes access cards and systems for EchoStar's Dish Network and other pay-TV services. Further, it’s alleged NDS then hired hackers to manufacture and distribute counterfeit NagraStar cards to pirates to steal Dish Network's programming for free.

    NagraStar and one of its parent companies, EchoStar, are seeking about $101 million for damages for piracy, copyright infringement, misconduct and unfair competition. The list of witnesses in the case includes EchoStar's founder and CEO Charlie Ergen; several hackers and pirates; and Reuven Hazak, an Israeli who heads security for NDS and is a former deputy head of Shabak, or Shin Bet, Israel's domestic security agency (the equivalent of Britain's MI5).
    The case, which began April 9 in the U.S. District Court's Central Division in Santa Ana, California, could conceivably result in an award of hundreds of millions of dollars, although neither side is expected to emerge unscathed from testimony that threatens to expose the messy underbelly of the high-stakes pay-TV industry.

    As if to emphasize this point, U.S. District Judge David O. Carter said after the proceedings began that he was concerned that the case would hinge on testimony from known lawbreakers like hackers and pirates, who have been employed by the companies on both sides of the lawsuit. The judge urged the plaintiffs and defendant to settle rather than face potentially devastating harm to their reputations.

    EchoStar wouldn't comment on the case while it's ongoing, but Jim Davis, a senior analyst with the 451 Group, a market research firm, said the company isn't likely to settle.

    "It gets taken very personal when your security product has been hacked," he said. "And to have a competitor do that through, allegedly, the services of a known hacker, has got to be particularly galling to NagraStar."
    As for NDS, which currently has more than 75 million access cards on the market, Davis says the company probably sees the trial as an opportunity to defend against the image that it is "simultaneously promoting a product that secures networks while working with folks that work outside the law [to break networks]."
    The company said in a statement to Wired.com: "We are confident our position will be upheld at a trial."
    According to court documents, the scheme began to unravel in 2000 when law-enforcement agents in Texas seized suspicious packages containing CD and DVD players stuffed with more than $40,000 in cash. Parcels similar to this were being sent almost daily from Canada, via Texas, to a hacker in California named Christopher Tarnovsky, who was working for NDS as an engineer... See previous post.. Kudelski Loses

    The money was allegedly part of the conspiracy between Tarnovsky and NDS Group to sabotage NagraStar's cards.
    As laid out in the allegations, NDS' hacking is said to have begun in 1997 after its own access cards were cracked and it was at risk of losing clients like DTV, which was being hit hard from pirates who were selling unfettered access to its system.
    But rather than deal with its security breach, NDS hired Tarnovsky and other pirates who had compromised its system to help the company hack and pirate its competitors' cards and even out the playing field, it is alleged.
    In addition to Tarnovsky, the company also hired Oliver Kommerling, a hacker known for writing the primer on cracking smartcards. Kommerling has acknowledged in an affidavit that he helped NDS set up a research lab in Haifa, Israel, where NagraStar's smartcard was allegedly cracked by NDS engineers.
    NDS didn't hire only hackers, however. According to EchoStar/NagraStar, it also hired a handful of other people with colorful pasts who they say had a role in hacking and pirating EchoStar/NagraStar. There was Reuven Hazak, who had been deputy head of Israel's Shin Bet during the notorious Bus 300 incident (when two Palestinian terrorists who hijacked an Israeli bus were killed in custody by a Shin Bet agent. Hazak eventually blew the whistle on the subsequent cover-up).
    NDS also hired a former U.S. Navy intelligence officer named John Norris and a former Scotland Yard commander named Ray Adams. Finally, it hired a former would-be terrorist, Yossi Tsuria, who became chief technical officer of its lab in Israel. Tsuria was part of a radical group of Jewish Israelis in the 1980s that plotted to bomb the Dome of the Rock -- a shrine that sits on the Temple Mount in Jerusalem, a holy site for both Jews and Muslims.
    NDS has maintained in public statements that Hazak, Norris and its other security officers were hired to help it track down hackers and pirates and get them arrested. But EchoStar and NagraStar allege that Hazak and Norris played central roles in committing hacking and piracy as well.

    In late 1997, NDS researchers in Israel reportedly cracked the NagraStar card after about six months of effort, using an electron microscope.

    NagraStar became aware its card was hacked in late 1998 when meeting with DTV to discuss the pay-TV company's desire to switch from the hacked NDS cards to NagraStar's cards. But DTV employees surprised NagraStar at the meeting when they informed NagraStar that its cards had also been hacked.
    EchoStar/NagraStar claim that NDS, aware that DTV was about to abandon its cards in favor of NagraStar cards, cracked NagraStar's card to discourage DTV from making the switch.
    After NDS cracked its rival's card, Tarnovsky and his associates allegedly created and sold counterfeit NagraStar cards through a piracy site based in Canada, among others, that allowed pirates to access Dish Network programs for free. Tarnovsky is also accused of later posting on the Canadian site the code, secret keys and instructions for hacking the microprocessor on EchoStar's access cards, allowing pirates to flood the market with even more cards. He has denied the allegations. Hazak and Norris are accused of providing Tarnovsky with the code so he could post it online, but NDS maintains this didn't happen.
    According to court documents, the sabotage scheme worked remarkably well throughout 1998 and 1999 as counterfeit NagraStar cards flooded the market.
    It was around this time, however, that a German hacker in Berlin known as Boris Floricic, aka Tron, disappeared while walking home from his parents' home one day. He was found several days later hanging from a belt in a park.
    Among his possessions, authorities found correspondence from NDS. NDS later said it had offered Boris a job, which he had rejected. Prior to his death, Boris had obtained source code and information about hacking access cards that were being used in a German satellite TV system. His friends in the German hacker group, Chaos Computer Club, were convinced that he'd met with foul play.

    Although his death was officially ruled a suicide, there were enough details around it to create suspicion. Floricic's feet were on the ground when he was found hanging, for example, and other evidence suggested that his body might have been placed in the park after he died.

    During this time, NagraStar wasn't the only alleged victim of NDS hacking and piracy. In 2002, the French pay-TV service Canal Plus filed a damages suit against NDS, from which the EchoStar/NagraStar case emerged. In an affidavit from that case, Kommerling disclosed that NDS had cracked the Canal Plus cards using a method he had taught its engineers in Israel. Then, he revealed, the company instructed Tarnovsky to post the Canal Plus code on the internet.
    The Canal Plus suit fizzled after its parent company, Vivendi Universal, struck a business deal with News Corporation that included a condition that Canal Plus would drop its suit against NDS. This is when EchoStar joined the litigation.
    Before Canal Plus's case against NDS died, Tarnovsky indicated to the company that Reuven Hazak had given him the Canal Plus code to post it on the internet. He reportedly told the French firm he would testify in the case, but later backed out, citing fear for his life and his family.
    In May 2002, two months after Canal Plus filed its suit, someone broke into the car of one of NDS' British employees and stole the hard drive from his laptop, making off with thousands of NDS documents and e-mails. EchoStar/NagraStar say the e-mails provide proof of NDS' hacking and piracy activities. NDS has suggested that the e-mails might be fabricated and has battled to keep them out of the court proceedings.
    NDS has denied the lawsuit allegations. The company maintains that it was simply engaging in reverse-engineering, as any company would do to understand rivals and compete in the marketplace, but that it did not distribute cards or information about hacking NagraStar's encryption to pirates.
    In an e-mail statement to Wired.com, the company stated this
    "The hacking of EchoStar was the result of inferior technology arising from inadequate investment in research and development by [NagraStar]," said the statement. "NDS, on the other hand, invests heavily in research and development.. we reinvested over 30 percent of our revenues into R&D -- and the result is that we have zero piracy and the platforms of our customers are completely secure"

    Trial last 2 more weeks.
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  5. #5
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    SANTA ANA, California (Reuters) - A computer hacker testified on Wednesday that a News Corp unit hired him to develop pirating software, but denied using it to penetrate the security system of a rival satellite television service.

    Christopher Tarnovsky -- who said his first payment was $20,000 in cash hidden in electronic devices mailed from Canada -- testified in a corporate-spying lawsuit brought against News Corp's NDS Group by DISH Network Corp (DISH.O: Quote, Profile, Research).

    The trial could result in hundreds of millions of dollars in damage awards.

    NDS, which provides security technology to a global satellite network that includes satellite TV service *******, denies the claims, saying it was only engaged in reverse engineering -- looking at a technology product to determine how it works, a standard in the electronics industry.

    After an introduction by plaintiff's attorney Chad Hagan as one of the "two best hackers in the world," Tarnovsky told the court that he was paid on a regular basis by Harper Collins, a publishing arm of News Corp, for 10 years.

    Tarnovsky said one of his first projects was to develop a pirating program to make DirectTV more secure.

    But lawyers for DISH Network claim Tarnovsky's mission was to hack into DISH's satellite network, steal the security code, then flood the market with pirated smart cards costing DISH $900 million in lost revenue and system-repair costs.

    Smart cards enable satellite TV converter boxes to bring in premium channels.

    The suit was brought by EchoStar Communications, which later split into two companies, DISH and EchoStar Corp, with DISH being the primary plaintiff.

    "I never got money for reprogramming Echostar cards," Tarnovsky said. "Someone is trying to set me up."

    DISH attorney Chad Hagan asked, "This is all a big conspiracy?"

    "Yes," Tarnovsky answered. He conceded that he constructed a device called "the stinger" that could communicate with any smart card in the world.

    Another hacker, Tony Dionisi, testified on Tuesday that Tarnovsky bragged about creating "the stinger" and that he knew of another hacker and NDS employee who reprogrammed 50 EchoStar smart cards with the device.

    The trial is expected to last another two to three weeks. It is being heard in southern California because both Tarnovsky and NDS are located there.
    Testing: Pansat 2500A, 2700A & 9200HD, Coolsat 5000, Sonicview 360

  6. #6
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    good information. nds don't have ethics.

  7. #7
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    By the way, NDS smart cards cannot be hacked at this moment?
    They are so secure?

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy75 View Post
    By the way, NDS smart cards cannot be hacked at this moment?
    They are so secure?

    But I think Cs is still working for NDS.May be I can wrong.


    Thanks.
    " 李俊明 Born To Help People "

    DM 500s , Pacific 3600 CI , Humax F2 Finder , Angel Box , My Dream Machine , Tatasky , KAON , Topfield 3030 , Yuri YR1Dap , Dynasat 7100 , F1 , Plus and II , Metabox II , 10 , Viva Vs 9000 , SkyBox II , X-Sat 430 , 420 , Bolt N2 , NewB , New Shine Ns 3000 , Victory V 889 , F1 Newshine , New Star , Innovia 3088 CA , Atom 7000 , PBI , Prosat , Dstv 3Q76 , GA 88a , Tatasky , Big Tv , Airtel .



  9. #9
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    oh yes it works well cs with nds cards. Thanks Rupert!

 

 

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