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Thread: Azimuth

  1. #1
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    Default Azimuth


    Hi Friends

    Pls. guide me how to get best azimuth for each satellite when the dish change the position...

  2. #2
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    You have to do a fine tuning on the dish, so that at every point the db of the quality range is at its most to most of the transponders at dish movement.
    Either use a receiver, or a sat meter for precision.


    azimuth

    This is the direction of a celestial object, measured clockwise around the observer's horizon from north. So an object due north has an azimuth of 0°, one due east 90°, south 180° and west 270°. Azimuth and altitude are usually used together to give the direction of an object in the topocentric coordinate system.

    Sometimes, south is used as the starting point for azimuth angles instead of north, but on the Heavens-Above web site, north is always the origin.

    We sometimes include the nearest compass direction as an abbreviation to help clarify the azimuth angles value in degrees. Up to three letters are used and they represent azimuth angles in the following order;

    N (0°), NNE (22.5°), NE (45°), ENE (67.5°), E (90°), ESE (112.5°), SE (135°), SSE (157.5°), S (180°), SSW (202.5°), SW (225°), WSW (247.5°), W (270°), WNW (292.5°), NW (315°), NNW (337.5°)

    Strict definition
    The azimuth of a point on the celestial sphere is defined as the angular distance measured towards the east, from north, along the astronomical horizon to the intersection of the great circle passing through the point and the astronomical zenith with the astronomical horizon.


  3. #3
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    thats a very comprehensive explanation w/ graphics examples!
    ************************************
    The more we learn things the more we hunger for more! That's human nature I guess!

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    Thanks Cogil..

    It's very clear explaination.....

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    @khan-thanks M8

    Quote Originally Posted by sat_vin View Post
    Thanks Cogil..

    It's very clear explaination.....
    Thanks for the pm and the comments
    appreciated, keep learning

  6. #6
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    The thing is setting up a Polor or H to H mount is not something your going to do in 5 minutes, It takes time to set up a dish to track the arc. But once you have set the dish on say Asiasat 2 then swing over to say Pas 2 [intelsat 2] Then go back to asiasat and re-adjust, then back to Pas, and re-adjust. Once these are perfectly alined all the satellites between the two will also be there. But it's all a question of balance between North / south, asmith and declenation, and sometimes it takes days to perfect the settings.

    Then when you have it set-up, attach the actuator , and set your satellite degree's on the positionner
    regards from OZ bassett

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