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  1. #31
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    Default Jules Verne to Orbit this Year

    Jules Verne to Orbit this Year
    PARIS, France, March 27, 2007


    Jules Verne, the first of five European Automated Transfer Vehicles (ATV), will be lofted into orbit in September or November after an extensive three-year test campaign by the European Space Agency (ESA). It will be the heaviest payload ever lifted by an Ariane 5 into space.

    Described as "the most complex spaceship ever developed in Europe," Jules Verne is the replacement for the Russian Progress spacecraft that now re-supply the International Space Station (ISS) with cargo. Another class of robotic spacecraft, the U.S.’ Autonomous Space Transfer and Robotic Orbiter, or Astro, prototype servicing satellite, was placed in orbit two weeks ago along with its companion spacecraft, NextSat. Both U.S. spacecraft are testing the ability of robotic refueling and servicing satellites in space. Such a capability could extend the lives of government and commercial spacecraft.

    In combination with the Ariane 5 heavy lift launcher, the 20.5 tonnes, 8.5 meter long ATV will enable Europe to transport cargo to the ISS. This new vehicle can carry nine tonnes of scientific equipment, general supplies, water, oxygen and propellant. ESA expects an ATV to be launched on average every 12 to 15 months as a means of ESA contributing to the station's operating costs. An ATV can remain docked for up to six months, during which time it will be loaded with station waste before being undocked and flown into Earth's atmosphere to burn up.

    During the coming months, Jules Verne will be prepared for flight operations, a task that that will include fine tuning its interfaces with the ISS and the station partners. To date, qualification tests on Jules Verne have been parallel run tests involving a variety of interfaces with different partners. The primary objective of this complex strategy is to ensure that Jules Verne's hardware and software can handle all possible nominal and off-nominal scenarios it might face during flight.

    The spacecraft’s rendezvous technique was tested successfully in France. At the RSC-Energia plant outside Moscow (manufacturing site for the ATV docking mechanism, the refuelling system and associated electronics) major computer simulations have been underway since December at the Ground Debugging Complex. Simulators purposely introduce failure scenarios and create artificially degraded situations that the ATV architecture must cope with, while respecting the tough requirements of human spaceflight.

    At the same Russian plant, another two-month campaign will test real interfaces with the massive replica of the 12.6 m long Russian Module at the Control and Testing Station (KIS) facility. Thanks to actual physical interfaces, it is possible to test the Russian docking and refueling system with real fluids and pressurized tanks. Jules Verne, like the Russian Progress vehicle, has the capability to refuel the Station with 860 kg of propellant and evacuate 840 kg of liquid waste.

    Meanwhile, at ESA's European Space Research and Technology Center (ESTEC), in Noordwijk, the Netherlands, Jules Verne underwent two major environment tests during 2006. The first one was the acoustic test to verify the capability of the spacecraft to withstand the noise loads experienced during launch. This test was successfully completed in July.

    Next came a thermal vacuum test to verify that Jules Verne, in active status, is able to sustain the harsh space conditions with extreme temperatures in a vacuum. Jules Verne completed this test in December.

    Also in 2006, the Jules Verne’s rendezvous technique was tested successfully. For the first time the system worked in complete "closed-loop" conditions where all aspects of the spacecraft were either represented for real or simulated such as Jules Verne's inertia and thruster firing.

    For the first time in space history, three space control centers around the globe will work together in monitoring one spacecraft. A dozen simulations involving the three centers are ongoing to fine tune procedures for nominal and off-nominal scenarios that Jules Verne could face.

    At the same time, the ISS Expedition 16 crew, Yuri Malenchenko and Peggy Whitson, have started the ATV training at the European Astronaut Center in Cologne, Germany. "Their task during rendezvous will be similar to that of an aircraft crew monitoring an auto-land involving 14 different parameters, with no back-up manual control except the possibility to command an automatic go-around maneuver," said ESA astronaut Jean-François Clervoy, senior advisor to the ATV program.

    The transportation of Jules Verne and its 400 tonnes of ground support equipment from ESA's test center in the Netherlands to Kourou, French Guiana, will take two weeks by sea on board the Ariane 5 transportation ship, Toucan.

    "It is very encouraging to see that most of the problems we have encountered in the last years are now solved and although we still have plenty of work to do, we can foresee that we will be ready to ship Jules Verne to French Guiana in the next few months ready for the launch," said John Ellwood ESA’s ATV Project Manager.

    Since the ATV is the heaviest and most complex spacecraft project ever developed in Europe, and because of its demanding requirements of human spacecraft safety, the launch campaign at the Centre Spatial Guyanais (CSG) in French Guiana will extend almost four months before lift-off.

    Source: ESA

  2. #32
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    Default SpaceX:Falcon1-Post Flight Data Review Positive

    SpaceX:Falcon1-Post Flight Data Review Positive
    March 27, 2007

    Having had several days to examine the data, the second test launch of Falcon 1 is looking increasingly positive. Post flight review of telemetry has verified that oscillation of the second stage late in the mission is the only thing that stopped Falcon 1 from reaching full orbital velocity. The second stage was otherwise functioning well and even deployed the satellite mass simulator ring at the end of flight! Actual final velocity was 5.1 km/s or 11,000 mph, whereas 7.5 km/s or 17,000 mph is needed for orbit. Altitude was confirmed to be 289 km or 180 miles, which is certainly enough for orbit and is about where the Space Shuttle enters its initial parking orbit.

    This confirms the end of the test phase for Falcon 1 and the beginning of the operational phase. The next Falcon 1 flight will carry the TacSat 1 satellite for the US Navy, with a launch window that begins in September, followed by Razaksat for the Malaysian Space Agency in November. Beyond that, we have another nine missions on manifest for F1 and F9. Note, the first F9 mission will also be a test flight and the three NASA F9/Dragon missions are all test flights for Dragon.

    Telemetry shows that engine shutdown occurred only about a minute and a half before schedule (roughly T + 7.5 mins), due to the oscillations causing propellant to slosh away from the sump. When the liquid level in the tank was low, this effectively starved the engine of propellant. A disproportionate amount of the velocity gain occurs in the final few minutes of flight, when the stage is very light, which is why the velocity difference is greater than just linearly subtracting 1.5 mins from the burn time.

    Except for a few blips here and there, we have now cleaned up the raw data feed and recovered video and telemetry for the entire mission well past 2nd stage shutdown. Including all the launch pad video and ground support equipment data, we have somewhere close to a terabyte of information to review. This was far too much to send over the T1 satellite link from Kwaj and had to be brought over in person after the flight. Given that a number of our engineers have only just returned from Kwaj, please consider this still a preliminary analysis:

    In a nutshell, the data shows that the increasing oscillation of the second stage was likely due to the slosh frequency in the liquid oxygen (LOX) tank coupling with the thrust vector control (engine steering) system. This started out as a pitch-yaw movement and then transitioned into a corkscrewing motion. For those that aren't engineers, imagine holding a bowl of soup and moving it from side to side with small movements, until the entire soup mass is shifting dramatically. Our simulations prior to flight had led us to believe that the control system would be able to damp out slosh, however we had not accounted for the perturbations of a contact on the stage during separation, followed by a hard slew to get back on track.

    The nozzle impact during stage separation occurred due to a much higher than expected vehicle rotation rate of about 2.5 deg/sec vs. max expected of 0.5 deg/sec. As the 2nd stage nozzle exited the interstage, the first stage was rotating so fast that it contacted the niobium nozzle. There was no apparent damage to the nozzle, which is not a big surprise given that niobium is tough stuff.

    The unexpectedly high rotation rate was due to not knowing the shutdown transient of the 1st stage engine (Merlin) under flight conditions. The actual shutdown transient had a very high pitch over force, causing five times the max expected rotation rate.

    We definitely intend to have both the diagnosis and cure vetted by third party experts, however we believe that the slosh issue can be dealt with in short order by adding baffles to our 2nd stage LOX tank and adjusting the control logic. Either approach separately would do the trick (eg. the Atlas-Centaur tank has no baffles), but we want to ensure that this problem never shows up again. The Merlin shutdown transient can be addressed by initiating shutdown at a much lower thrust level, albeit at some risk to engine reusability. Provided we have a good set of slosh baffles, even another nozzle impact at stage separation would not pose a significant flight risk, although obviously we will work hard to avoid that.

    I will be posting another DemoFlight 2 post launch update within a week, which will include a list of all subsystems color coded for status: green = good, yellow = cause for concern, red = flight failure if unchanged, black = untested. Of the hundreds of subsystems on the rocket, only the 2nd stage LOX tank slosh baffles are clearly red right now, but that could change with further analysis. As much as is reasonably possible (subject to ITAR and proprietary info), SpaceX will provide full disclosure with respect to the findings of the mission review team.

    The Difference Between a Test Flight and an Operational Satellite Mission

    There seems to be a lot of confusion in the media about what constitutes a success. The critical distinction is that a test flight has many gradations of success, whereas an operational satellite mission does not. Although we did our best at SpaceX to be clear about last week's launch, including naming it DemoFlight 2 and explicitly not carrying a satellite, a surprising number of people still evaluated the test launch as though it were an operational mission.

    This is neither fair nor reasonable. Test flights are used to gather data before flying a "real" satellite and the degree of success is a function of how much data is gathered. The problem with our first launch is that, although it taught us a lot about the first stage, ground support equipment and launch pad, we learned very little about the second stage, apart from the avionics bay. However, that first launch was still a partial success, because of what we learned and, as shown by flight two, that knowledge was put to good use: there were no flight critical issues with the first stage on flight two.

    The reason that flight two can legitimately be called a near complete success as a test flight is that we have excellent data throughout the whole orbit insertion profile, including well past second stage shutdown, and met all of the primary objectives established beforehand by our customer (DARPA/AF). This allows us to wrap up the test phase of the Falcon 1 program and transition to the operational phase, beginning with the TacSat mission at the end of summer. Let me be clear here and now that anything less than orbit for that flight or any Falcon 1 mission with an operational satellite will unequivocally be considered a failure.

    This is not "spin" or some clever marketing trick, nor is this distinction an invention of SpaceX -- it has existed for decades. The US Air Force made the same distinction a few years ago with the demonstration flight of the Delta IV Heavy, which also carried no primary satellite. Although the Delta IV Heavy fell materially short of its target velocity and released its secondary satellites into an abnormally low altitude, causing reentry in less than one orbit, it was still correctly regarded by Boeing and the Air Force as a successful test launch, because sufficient data was obtained to transition to an operational phase.

    It is perhaps worth drawing an analogy with more commonplace consumer products. Before software is released, it is beta tested in non-critical applications, where bugs are worked out, before being released for critical applications, although some companies have been a little loose with this rule. Cars go through a safety and durability testing phase before being released for production. Rockets may involve rocket science, but are no different in this regard.

    Falcon 1 DemoFlight 2- Kwajalein Atoll still in view


    Falcon 1 DemoFlight 2 - Shortly after first stage separation


    Falcon 1 DemoFlight 2 - Shortly after fairing separation


    Falcon 1 DemoFlight 2- Red-hot nozzle with Earth's curvature in the background


    Falcon 1 DemoFlight 2- End of mission, nozzle high above the horizon

    Source: SPACEX

  3. #33
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    Default Falcon 1

    FALCON 1 OVERVIEW

    The Falcon launch vehicle family is designed to provide breakthrough advances in reliability, cost, flight environment and time to launch. The primary design driver is and will remain reliability, as described in more detail below. We recognize that nothing is more important than getting our customer’s spacecraft safely to its intended destination.

    Falcon 1 is a two stage, liquid oxygen and rocket grade kerosene (RP-1) powered launch vehicle. It is designed from the ground up for cost efficient and reliable transport of satellites to low Earth orbit.

    Length: 21.3 m (70 ft)
    Width: 1.7 m (5.5 ft)
    Mass: 38,555 kg (85 klbs)
    Thrust on liftoff: 454 kN (102 klbf)
    All performance data reflects the updated Falcon 1 vehicle available in 2009 and beyond.

    Falcon 1 in front of the FAA in Washington, D.C.

    FIRST STAGE

    The primary structure is made of a space grade aluminum alloy in a patent pending, graduated monocoque, common bulkhead, flight pressure stabilized architecture developed by SpaceX. The design is a blend between a fully pressure stabilized design, such as Atlas II, and a heavier isogrid design, such as Delta II. As a result, we have been able to capture the mass efficiency of pressure stabilization, but avoid the ground handling difficulties of a structure unable to support its own weight.

    A single SpaceX Merlin engine (described below) powers the Falcon 1 first stage. After engine start, Falcon is held down until all vehicle systems are verified to be functioning normally before release for liftoff.

    Helium tank pressurization is provided by composite over-wrapped inconel tanks from Arde Corporation, the same model used in Boeing’s Delta IV rocket.

    Stage separation occurs via dual initiated separation bolts and a pneumatic pusher system. All components are space qualified and have flown before on other launch vehicles.

    The first stage returns by parachute to a water landing, where it is picked up by ship in a procedure similar to that of the Space Shuttle solid rocket boosters. The parachute recovery system is built for SpaceX by Irvin Parachute Corporation, who also builds the Shuttle booster recovery system.

    SECOND STAGE

    The tank structure is made of aluminum-lithium, an alloy possessing the highest strength to weight ratio of any aluminum and currently used by the Space Shuttle External Tank. Although we intend to continue researching alternatives in the long term, for this particular application it has the lowest total system mass for any material we have examined, including liquid oxygen compatible super-alloys and composites.

    The tanks are precision machined from thick plate with integral flanges and ports, minimizing the number of welds necessary. The major circumferential welds are all done by an automated welding machine, reducing the potential for error and ensuring consistent quality.

    A single SpaceX Kestrel engine powers the Falcon 1 upper stage. A highly reliable and proven TEA-TEB pyrophoric system is used to provide multiple restart capability on the upper stage.

    Helium pressurization is again provided by composite over wrapped inconel tanks from Arde. However, in this case the helium is also used in cold gas thrusters for attitude control and propellant settling when a restart is needed.

    Typical Falcon 1 flight profile for direct insertion from launch through deployment and recovery of 1st stage

    SPACEX MERLIN ENGINE


    The main engine, called Merlin, was developed internally at SpaceX, but draws upon a long heritage of space proven engines. The pintle style injector at the heart of Merlin was first used in the Apollo Moon program for the lunar module landing engine, one of the most critical phases of the mission.

    Propellant is fed via a single shaft, dual impeller turbo-pump operating on a gas generator cycle. The turbo-pump also provides the high pressure kerosene for the hydraulic actuators, which then recycles into the low pressure inlet. This eliminates the need for a separate hydraulic power system and means that thrust vector control failure by running out of hydraulic fluid is not possible. A third use of the turbo-pump is to provide roll control by actuating the turbine exhaust nozzle.

    Combining the above three functions into one device that we know is functioning before the vehicle is allowed to lift off means a significant improvement in system level reliability.

    Sea Level Thrust : 102,000 lb
    Vacuum Thrust: 115,000 lb
    Sea Level Isp: 255s
    Vacuum Isp: 304s
    Thrust to weight (fully accounted): 96

    With a vacuum specific impulse of 304s, Merlin is the highest performance gas generator cycle kerosene engine ever built, exceeding the Boeing Delta II main engine, the Lockheed Atlas II main engine and the Saturn V F-1.

    SPACEX KESTREL ENGINE


    Kestrel, also built around the pintle architecture, is designed to be a high efficiency, low pressure vacuum engine. It does not have a turbo-pump and is fed only by tank pressure.

    Kestrel is ablatively cooled in the chamber and throat and radiatively cooled in the nozzle, which is fabricated from a high strength niobium alloy. As a metal, niobium is highly resistant to cracking compared to carbon-carbon. An impact from orbital debris or during stage separation would simply dent the metal, but have no meaningful effect on engine performance. Helium pressurant efficiency is substantially increased via a titanium heat exchanger on the ablative/niobium boundary.

    Thrust vector control is provided by electro-mechanical actuators on the engine dome for pitch and yaw. Roll control (and attitude control during coast phases) is provided by helium cold gas thrusters.

    A highly reliable and proven TEA-TEB pyrophoric system is used to provide multiple restart capability on the upper stage. In a multi-manifested mission, this allows for drop off at different altitudes and inclinations.

    Vacuum Thrust : 7,000 lb
    Vacuum Isp: 327s
    Thrust to weight: 42

    DESIGNED FOR MAXIMUM RELIABILITY

    The vast majority of launch vehicle failures in the past two decades can be attributed to three causes: engine, stage separation and, to a much lesser degree, avionics failures. An analysis of launch failure history between 1980 and 1999 by Aerospace Corporation showed that 91% of known failures can be attributed to those subsystems.

    ENGINE RELIABILITY

    It was with this in mind that we designed Falcon 1 to have the minimum number of engines. As a result, there is only one engine per stage and only one stage separation event – the minimum pragmatically possible number.

    Another notable point is the SpaceX hold-before-release system – a capability required by commercial airplanes, but not implemented on many launch vehicles. After first stage engine start, the Falcon is held down and not released for flight until all propulsion and vehicle systems are confirmed to be operating normally. An automatic safe shut-down and unloading of propellant occurs if any off nominal conditions are detected.

    STAGE SEPARATION RELIABILITY

    Here Falcon takes advantage of simplicity by having two stages and therefore only one stage separation event – the minimum practical number. Moreover, the stage separation bolts are all dual initiated, fully space qualified and have a zero failure track record in prior launch vehicles.

    FAIRING VOLUME

    Below are the standard fairing dimensions for Falcon 1. Dimensions are in meters and in inches inside the parentheses. Custom fairings in larger lengths and diameters are available at incremental cost.

    Falcon 1 - 1.5 m fairing

    PRICING AND PERFORMANCE

    SpaceX offers open and fixed pricing that is the same for all customers, including a best price guarantee. Modest discounts are available for contractually committed, multi-launch purchases.

    Falcon 1 is the world’s lowest cost per flight to orbit of a production rocket.

  4. #34
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    Default Arianespace to launch two Intelsat payloads

    Arianespace to launch two Intelsat payloads
    Monday, April 2nd, 2007


    Arianespace announced today that it will launch the Horizons-2 spacecraft for Horizons Satellite LLC (a joint venture between Intelsat and JSAT), and Intelsat-11 for Intelsat. An Ariane 5 will orbit both payloads from the Guiana Space Center in French Guiana during the third quarter of 2007. After delivery to geostationary transfer orbit, Horizons-2 will occupy an orbital slot at 74 degrees West Longitude, and Intelsat-11 will be located at 43 degrees West Longitude.

    Weighing approximately 2,350 kg. at liftoff, the Horizons-2 satellite - based on Orbital Science’s STAR satellite platform - carries 20 high-power Ku-band transponders, and will generate 3.5 kilowatts of payload power. This powerful new satellite will provide service for everything from digital video, high-definition television (HDTV) and IP-based content
    distribution networks, to broadband Internet and satellite news services in the continental United States, the Caribbean and parts of Canada.

    The Intelsat-11 spacecraft, also built by Orbital Sciences, will weigh approximately 2,500 kg. at liftoff. Its 34 transponders will provide direct- to-home broadcasting and data networking services to Latin America.

    (Source: Arianespace)

  5. #35
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    Default

    Satelitul Astra 1L a ajuns in Guineea franceza si va fi lansat cu racheta Ariane 5 impreuna cu satelitul Galaxy 17 al Intelsat;Astra 1L are 29 tp .

  6. #36
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    Default Russia to launch three communication satellites in 2007, two in 2008

    Russia to launch three communication satellites in 2007, two in 2008
    Wednesday, April 4th, 2007


    Russia will put three new communication satellites into orbit this year and another two next year, the acting director of a state-run satellite communications company said today. Yury Izmailov said an Express-AM33 comsat will be launched in September and another two satellites, Express-AM44 and Express-MD1, in December. He said another two satellites, Express-AM4 and Express-MD2, will be sent into space next year.

    Izmailov said previously that 15 new communications satellites will be launched before 2015 under a new Federal Space Program to provide mobile communications for the president and government, and digital TV and radio broadcasts for the majority of remote regions in Russia and the CIS.

    Last year, Russia lost its Express AM11 satellite when it apparently collided with space junk, causing it to spin and leave its orbit. The satellite, equipped with 30 transponders, was put into orbit April 27, 2004. It was built jointly with France’s Alcatel Space and Sodern, with some equipment made in Germany and Japan. The spacecraft was supposed to remain in orbit at least 12 years.

    (Souce: RIA Novosti)

  7. #37
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    Default

    ASTRA 1L scheduled for 3 May 2007 from Kourou
    Betzdorf, 14 March 2007. SES ASTRA, an SES company (Euronext Paris and Luxembourg Stock Exchange: SESG), has announced today that the launch of its new satellite ASTRA 1L onboard an Ariane 5 rocket is scheduled for 3 May 2007 from the launch site of Kourou, French Guiana. ASTRA 1L is the 9th ASTRA satellite launched with Arianespace and the 3rd ASTRA satellite launched with an Ariane 5 rocket.
    ASTRA 1L is an A2100 AXS type of satellite built by Lockheed Martin Commercial Space Systems (LMCSS). It will join the ASTRA satellites currently co-positioned at 19.2° East to operate as a replacement satellite for existing capacity and to strengthen ASTRA’s unique redundancy and customer security scheme.
    Martin Halliwell, Chief Technology Officer of SES ASTRA, said: “After the successful launches that we have already experienced together, we feel very confident that we have chosen the right partner for the launch of our new satellite. This is the first Ariane launch of an ASTRA spacecraft since ASTRA 3A in March 2002. We are excited to be returning to Kourou to work once again with the colleagues from Arianespace and look forward to a successful mission.”

  8. #38
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    Default ILS Proton to Launch Anik F3

    ILS Proton to Launch Anik F3

    Payload: Anik F3, Eurostar E3000 platform
    Separated Mass: Approx. 4,640 kg (10,229 lbs)

    Launch Vehicle: Proton M/Breeze M
    Weight at Liftoff: 691,272 kg (1.5 million lbs), including payload
    Height: 57.2 m (186.6 ft)

    Launch Time: 04:54 April 10 Baikonur, 22:54 April 9 GMT, 18:54 April 9 EDT
    Launch Site: Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan; Launch Pad 39

    End User: Telesat Canada, Ottawa, Ontario

    Satellite Manufacturer: EADS Astrium, Toulouse, France

    Launch Vehicle
    Manufacturer: Khrunichev State Research and Production Space Center, Moscow

    Launch Services
    Provider: International Launch Services (ILS), McLean, Va.

    Satellite Use: Multipurpose communications satellite with payloads
    in Ku-, C- and Ka-band. The Ku- and C-bands will carry a wide range of
    broadcasting, telecommunications, business and Internet-based services
    throughout North America. The small Ka-band payload will supplement
    services now carried on Anik F2.

    Satellite Statistics:

    32 active Ku-band transponders

    24 active C-band transponders

    2 active channels at Ka-band

    Orbital location: 118.7 degrees West longitude

    Anticipated service life of 15 years

    Mission Profile: The Proton launch vehicle will inject the satellite into geosynchronous transfer orbit, using a five-burn Breeze M mission design. The first three stages of the Proton will use a standard ascent trajectory to place the Breeze M fourth stage, with the satellite, into a suborbital trajectory, from which the Breeze M will place itself and the spacecraft into a circular reference, or parking, orbit of 173 km (107.5 miles), inclined at 51.5 degrees. Then the satellite will be propelled to its transfer orbit by additional burns of the Breeze M. Following separation from the Breeze M, the spacecraft will perform a series of liquid apogee engine burns to raise perigee, lower inclination and circularize the orbit at the geostationary altitude of 35,786 km (22,236 miles).

    Target Orbit
    at Separation: Apogee: 35,786 km (22,236 miles); Perigee: 3,200 km (1,988 miles); Inclination: 11 degrees

    Spacecraft Separation: Approximately 9 hours, 11 minutes after liftoff

    ILS Mission Statistics:

    4th ILS launch for Telesat Canada on Proton

    1st ILS mission for 2007

    1st Proton mission this year

    40th ILS mission on Proton

    6th Proton launch of E3000 bus

    325th Proton launch

    Live Broadcast
    in North America: Intelsat IA-6, transponder 11, C-band, 93 degrees West, downlink 3920 MHz (vertical), analog NTSC. Test signals start at 6 p.m. EDT.

    Live Broadcast
    in Europe: New Skies NSS-7, transponder WHL4/EUH3 CH1, Ku-band, 338 degrees West downlink 11098.9 MHz (horizontal), digital PAL symbol rate 6.1113, fec: 3/4. Test signals start at 22:00 GMT.

    More Information: Live webcast and general mission information are available on the ILS web site at www.ilslaunch.com.

    (Source: ILS)

  9. #39
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    Default Optus invests in third D-series satellite

    Optus invests in third D-series satellite

    Singapore Telecommunications Limited (SGT) subsidiary Optus today announced it would expand its satellite fleet providing services to New Zealand and Australia by launching the third D-series satellite. The telco said the new satellite would increase its fleet capacity by more than 30%.

    Chief executive Paul O’Sullivan said the deal showed Optus’ continued investment and commitment to provide the infrastructure to deliver state-of-the-art services via satellite across New Zealand and Australia.

    “This announcement is another example of Optus making a substantial investment to increase Australia’s communications capability,” he said in a statement.

    “Optus’ satellite fleet delivers a unique communications capability for New Zealand and Australia which no other telecommunications company in Australia can match.

    “The decision to build a third D-series satellite follows continued demand for access, especially for television broadcast services, with icon companies such as SKY Television in New Zealand and FOXTEL in Australia.”

    SKY chief executive John Fellet said the extra capacity made available by Optus purchasing a third satellite provides a vehicle for future growth and would enable SKY to deliver new services to its customers such as high definition content.

    Orbital Sciences Corporation of the United States, the manufacturer of the Optus D1 and D2 satellites, was confirmed as the manufacturer of the Optus D3 satellite.

    Optus said the D3 satellite would be delivered in 2009 and would increase the company’s overall investment in the D-series satellite program to over $600 million.

    At 1544 AEST, Australian-listed shares in SingTel were unchanged at $2.63.

    (Source: http://www.egoli.com.au/egoli/egoliN...E09415A75CB%7D )

  10. #40
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    Default

    Lansarea satelitului Anik F3 este prevazuta pentru noaptea asta (9-10 apr) la ora 22:54 GMT (1:54 RO)
    http://www.ilslaunch.com/zmedia/news...eleases/rec17/
    http://streamvox.streamos.com/vyvx/ils040907/

  11. #41
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    Default

    Lansare reusita!

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    Default Telesat Canada prepares to launch Anik F3 satellite

    Telesat Canada prepares to launch Anik F3 satellite
    Monday, April 9th, 2007


    Telesat Canada is preparing to launch the Anik F3 satellite at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. The launch is scheduled for 2254 UTC this evening. The new satellite will provide broadcasting and telecommunications capacity, business communications, and Internet-based services throughout North America.

    Anik F3 is Telesat’s second European-built satellite. The new spacecraft, manufactured by EADS Astrium, will allow the firm to fully develop the 118.7 degrees WL orbital position, and enable the expansion of Telesat’s business throughout the Americas. Along with 24 C-band and 32 Ku-band communications channels, Anik F3 will carry a small Ka-band payload to supplement services now being carried on its sister satellite, Anik F2.

    (Source: Telesat via Marketnews.ca)

  13. #43
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    Default ILS Proton Successfully Launches Anik F3 Satellite

    ILS Proton Successfully Launches Anik F3 Satellite
    40th Mission for U.S.-Russian Joint Venture
    BAIKONUR COSMODROME, Kazakhstan, April 10, 2007

    International Launch Services (ILS) successfully placed the Anik F3 satellite into orbit today with a Russian Khrunichev-built Proton Breeze M rocket.

    The vehicle lifted off from Pad 39 at the Baikonur Cosmodrome at 4:54 a.m. local time (6:54 p.m. Monday EDT, 22:54 Monday GMT). The three-stage Proton vehicle climbed through the atmosphere for nearly 10 minutes before sending the Breeze M upper stage and its satellite payload on to continue the 9-hour-11-minute mission. The Anik F3 satellite, built for Telesat Canada by EADS Astrium, separated from the Breeze M at 2:05 p.m. local time (4:05 a.m. today EDT, 08:05 today GMT).

    This was the fourth ILS Proton launch for Telesat, which launched its Anik F1R satellite in 2005, as well as Nimiq 1 in 1999 and Nimiq 2 in 2002 on Proton.


    "We thank Telesat for its continued confidence in ILS and in the Proton Breeze M," said ILS President Frank McKenna. "We know we have to deliver outstanding performance to earn repeat business. We look forward to launching with Telesat and Astrium in the future, including next year's scheduled mission for Nimiq 4."

    The Anik F3 satellite uses an Astrium Eurostar 3000 bus, and is the sixth of this model to be launched by Proton. The Nimiq 4 spacecraft also is a Eurostar 3000. ILS also has launched two Eurostar 2000 models.

    "We are grateful to both ILS and Astrium for their flawless execution of this important mission for Telesat," said Dan Goldberg, Telesat's President and CEO. "We deeply value our association with these two premier organizations and look forward to joining with them in Baikonur next year for the launch of our Nimiq 4 satellite."

    "This is a major event for Astrium. We mobilized our expert teams right across Europe to ensure the success of this mission," said Antoine Bouvier, CEO of Astrium Satellites. "The excellent teamwork developed with ILS and Telesat personnel has been crucial to this success."

    Today's mission was the 40th ILS Proton launch. ILS is a U.S.-Russian joint venture that has exclusive worldwide rights to market commercial satellite launches on the Proton launcher, workhorse of the Russian space program. ILS also provides mission management. The major joint venture partners are Space Transport Inc., a privately held company, and Proton builder Khrunichev State Research and Production Space Center of Moscow.

    With today's launch, the Proton vehicle has carried out 325 missions for the Russian government and commercial customers over more than 40 years.

    ILS is incorporated in Delaware in the United States, and is headquartered in McLean, Va., a suburb of Washington, D.C.

    (Source: ILS)

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    Quote Originally Posted by first_zipper View Post
    Telesat Canada is preparing to launch the Anik F3 satellite at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.
    Il mai lanseaza odata?

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    Default New Shuttle launch dates announced

    New Shuttle launch dates announced
    17 April 2007


    NASA has announced a revised launch schedule for the upcoming Space Shuttle missions. The revised schedule follows a review of repairs to the insulation on the Shuttle's external fuel tank, which was damaged during a sudden hail storm over NASA's Florida launch site in February.

    Repairs to the external fuel tank are expected to be ready for the launch of Space Shuttle Atlantis on the STS-117 mission no earlier than 8 June 2007. The launch window for STS-117 extends to 18 July 2007.

    The STS-118 mission - the second Space Shuttle flight of the year - is due to follow during a launch window that opens on 9 August 2007.

    Originally scheduled for August, the STS-120 mission with ESA astronaut Paolo Nespoli, which will also carry the Italian-built Node 2 connecting module into orbit, is now targeted for 20 October 2007.

    Flight STS-122, which will see the launch of the Columbus laboratory, one of Europe's major contributions to the International Space Station, is now due for launch from NASA's Kennedy Space Centre on 6 December 2007. The crew of the STS-122 mission includes ESA astronauts Hans Schlegel and Leopold Eyharts.

    (Source: NASA)

 

 

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