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Thread: Ces 2010

  1. #1
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    Talking Ces 2010

    Samsung LED 9000 Ultra-Thin TV Unveiled
    January 6, 2010


    Samsung have unveiled a number of TVís over at CES 2010. The top of the range TV to be revealed is the Samsung LED 9000 series ultra-thin screen that achieves itís thinness by cramming a lot of the innards in to the pedestal it sits on.
    The screen itís self looks great and runs at 240Hz to allow for smoother video to be run. A unique remote control was also launched that is capable of showing content on itís screen from other video sources making it very unique.
    The TV follows on with the 2010 theme of 3D and will be capable of transforming regular 2D content in to 3D (somehow) as well as being able to play 3D content thatís due out later this year.
    Other than knowing itís called the 9000 series, the ultra-thin LED hasnít been given a price, or any variation models within the 9000 range as of yet. They are however, expected to be launched later this year.



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    Talking A New World's Largest TV, With an Asterisk

    A New World's Largest TV, With an Asterisk
    01.07.2010


    Image above: Behold, 152 Inches

    This year at CES, Panasonic revived something we haven't seen in a while--the battle of the biggest screen. Already the current title holder with its 150-inch plasma screen from 2008, Panasonic came to Vegas this year with two 152-inch behemoths, bettering their own record. But there's a bit of a catch.

    The catch is that the 152-inch screen is made with the exact same piece of glass that created the 150-incher; tweaks to the bezeling opened up a tiny bit more screen around the edges, increasing the viewable images size by two inches (and stretching the aspect ratio to 17:9 from the standard 16:9).

    That's not to say that the 152-incher is just a cheap trick. The giant sets that make the rounds at tradeshows represent the largest single piece of glass the factory is able to produce. This "mother glass" is designed to efficiently yield the maximum number of panels when it is cut into the glass for smaller sets (the 152" TV's glass normally yields nine 50-inch TVs).

    Dr. Larry F. Weber, an engineer who helped invent the plasma TV at the University of Chicago in the 1960s, was in Panasonic's booth watching the oglers. He explained to me that in making a prototype set, it's important to keep a larger margin around the outside of the glass to connect the display's electrical components. As the technology improves, however, less space around the edge is needed.

    And thus, 152 inches instead of 150. Progress, march on.

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    Talking How 3-D TV Works

    How 3-D TV Works
    01.06.2010

    The 3-D thrill that swept movie theaters last year is now headed for your living room. In the wake of a new Blu-ray standard for high-definition 3-D, Panasonic, Sony and Samsung are all releasing home-theater setups that can display 3-D movies in full high-def glory. Using a combo of 3-D-capable Blu-ray players, TVs and, yes, glasses, the systems are able to deliver separate, full-screen, 1080p pictures to each eye. The technique they use creates a picture as vivid as in a movie theater without requiring a major overhaul of TV technology. And within a few years, a new cable television standard could even bring live events like the Super Bowl right to your TV in high-def 3-D.

    THE BLU-RAY PLAYER


    Image above: Samsung BD-C6900

    Blu-ray discs have plenty of room to store a separate 1080p signal for each eye (thatís twice as much information as in a 2-D movie), as well as the coding necessary to specify which image is meant for the left side and which for the right. 3-D-ready players use a special chip to interpret this info and send it to a 3-D-capable TV.

    THE TV


    Image above: Sony Bravia XBR-60LX900

    We see depth when images from our left and right eyes merge into one; to re-create that in high-def, TVs must refresh the picture at least 120 times a second with alternating frames for the left and right eye, which tricks your brain into seeing only one image. Most new TVs are fast enough to do this, but to be 3-D-capable, TVs must include a converter chip and software to break down the signal and separate the left and right images. An infrared or radio beam syncs shutter glasses [below] with the screen to produce the final 3-D effect.

    THE GLASSES


    Image above: Panasonic Active-Shutter Glasses

    Active-shutter glasses, like those included in Panasonicís system, rapidly block one eye at a time so that each eye sees only the frame meant for it. The glasses contain two small, black-and-clear LCD lenses that darken or lighten when a radio or infrared pulse from the TV (or an add-on emitter) signals that the image is changing.

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    Talking Toshiba Cell TV Converts All Video to 3-D With Playstation 3's Processor

    Toshiba Cell TV Converts All Video to 3-D With Playstation 3's Processor
    01.06.2010


    Image above: Toshiba's Cell TV Note the mandatory (but wireless) set-top box

    When it comes to their home entertainment gear, Toshiba loves to do two things: stick Cell processors (the same brain powering the Playstation 3) inside them, and tout the ability to upconvert your crappy standard-def or web-streaming video to glorious high-def. Their Cell TV, just unveiled at CES, promises to do both things, but with an added selling point befitting this year's 3-D theme: upconversion of any two-dimensional source into 3-D in real time.

    Their are a few worn adages that come to mind: "If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is." Or perhaps something about a pig in lipstick? Either way, we're obviously holding judgement on the quality of the 3-D conversion until we actually get to strap on our frame-sequential glasses and try these for ourselves.

    But aside from the 3-D magic, the cell TV packs in plenty of other features: the included set-top box (which houses the 3.2 GHz, 8-core Cell processor) essentially as a home theater PC, with its included Blu-ray player, 802.11N wi-fi, 1TB hard drive and a DLNA server and client (for playing back video from other devices on your network).

    As for the picture quality, Toshiba's hyping the Cell's processing power with its ability to constantly tweak the picture while you're watching for the best possible quality. It will keep track of 512 local dimming zones in its LED backlight (quite a few more than is standard now) to keep blacks as black as possible, and an ambient light sensor adjusts color balance and brightness according to the lighting conditions in your living room. They're also, of course, promising even more impressive upconversion of standard-def video using the Cell processor, including the live feed of Grandma's face from the built-in videophone. Grandma HD! How nice.

    The Cell TV will be available in sizes going from 46 to 65 inches later this year. As is usually the case at CES, there is no info on pricing or an actual release date.

 

 

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